So Energy = Work ( ability of) = Force x Distance = (Mass x acceleration ) x distance  =  (Mass x [rate of change of velocity ] x distance ) =  kg x m/s2 x m  = Kg x ( m/s )2  in the New Concept this would be read as  follows -    kg. x  ( 1, 463.831 Chm/P )2 .  (see also  Page 47)

 

 

Relativistic Energy

 

Generalisation of momentum in keeping with the principal of relativity. Likewise the definition of kinetic energy  ( see C. P. page 896 ) mv2/2 was changed by Einstein to

 

Kinetic Energy                               K E = mc2 - m 0c2

 

 

Where m0c2 is a term which is independent  of the speed of the object and it is called the rest energy of the object . The term mc2 , which depends on the objectís speed  is therefore the sum of the  kinetic and rest energies . We define  mc2 to be the total energy E, that is

 

                                              E = mc2 = K E  + m0c2 

 

 

This is  Einsteinís famous mass-energy equivalence equation The relation E = mc2 shows that  the mass is a form of Energy. Furthermore, this result shows that even a small mass corresponds to an enormous amount of energy.

 

Energy = E which has been dealt with above has mass in Kg. and velocity of light  c.

For Example, the mass of an electron is  9.11  x  10 - 31 kg. Hence , its rest energy is

(see Page 897 C. P.)

 

                                m 0c2 =( 9.11 x 10  - 31  kg) ( 3 x 10 8 m/s)2 = 8.2 x 10 - 14    J

 

 

here we see that according to  the New Concept  the Mass  kg  remains kg,  meter m changes to  (1ł 463.831) Chm  , second s changes to P &  J from C. P.  page 80 &  110
 J = N.m and N = 1kg.m/s2also N.m = J=1kg. (m/s)2
According to the concept J changes to
J  = 1kg. ( 1.463.831 Chm/ P)2.
And  m0c2 = 8.2 x  10 - 14  J
  would read  according to the New Concept as -

  m0c2 = 8.2 x 10-14 1kg. ( 1.463.831 Chm/P)2.  

 

As such, the New Concept is in no way in conflict with Max Planckís or Albert Einsteinís Theories.

 

 

 


(55)

Go to Page

Cover Page Comments Title page I II III IV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 INDEX i ii iii iv About the Author